Jehovah, Yahweh

Jehovah, Yahweh

For the Korean version, see this. (Reposted in 2022; originally posted bilingually in Korean and English in 2019)

In Christianity, the God of Israel in the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) is known as Jehovah. As the title of the article suggests, however, Yahweh is also the name of Israel’s God. Assuming that most Christians are unaware of how these two names became in use interchangeably, I will explain the names Jehovah and Yahweh.

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The Hebrew origin of the name Jesus

  • This post, originally posted bilingually, in Korean and English, back in 2019, deals with the Hebrew origin of the name “Jesus.” Now the post is separated in each language. For the Korean version, see this.

Joshua

Joshua is the successor of Moses. According to the book of Joshua, he led the people of Israel to the “promised land,” Canaan, crossing the Jordan river. You can consider the events of the exodus from Egypt and entering Canaan as God’s salvation. Joshua’s being the leader of the time, in which Israel had marched and entered Canaan, therefore, suggests his prime importance in Israel’s history.

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Isaiah (2)

*This post was originally published bilingually in English as well as Korean back in 2018. Now the post is separated in each language. For the Korean version, see this.

The Tripartite Division of Isaiah and the Problem of the Authorship of the Book of Isaiah (2)

#1. Second Isaiah has been traditionally regarded to be chs. 40-55. As mentioned in the previous post, however, chs. 34-35, which originally was deemed to belong to First Isaiah, is these days viewed as Second Isaiah. Second Isaiah mainly prophesizes the restoration of Judah from the Babylonian destruction (the judgment of God), and its geographical backdrop is primarily Babylon. Second Isaiah even talks about the return from the Babylonian deportation:

Go out from Babylon, flee from Chaldea,
declare this with a shout of joy, proclaim it,
send it forth to the end of the earth;
say, “The LORD has redeemed his servant Jacob!” (Is 48:20, NRSV)

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Isaiah (1)

*This post was originally published bilingually in English as well as Korean back in 2018. Now the post is separated in each language. For the English version, see this.

The Tripartite Division of Isaiah and the Problem of the Authorship of the Book of Isaiah (1)

Have you ever heard of the terms, such as Second Isaiah (or Deutero-Isaiah) and Third Isaiah (or Trito-Isaiah)? These are quite common terms for Hebrew Bible scholars but, I guess, not for most lay Christians. If you have a good sense of intuition, you would know that these words have something to do with the author of the book of Isaiah. If you have a little better sense of intuition, then you may even notice that these words suggest that the historical Isaiah is not the only one who is responsible for the composition of the book of Isaiah.

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Lamentations

Lamentations

*This post was originally published bilingually in English as well as Korean back in 2018. Now the post is separated in each language. For the Korean version, see this.

What is the matter?

Many Christians assume that the prophet Jeremiah wrote the book of Lamentations in the Hebrew Bible. But Hebrew Bible scholars came up with some ideas that significantly challenge such an assumption. Why have people been assuming that Jeremiah is the author of the book of Lamentations? And what is the evidence that Jeremiah is not the author of that book?

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